Some funds invest in the indexes of mining companies, others are tied directly to gold prices, while still others are actively managed. Read their prospectuses for more information. Traditional mutual funds tend to be actively managed, while ETFs adhere to a passive index-tracking strategy, and therefore have lower expense ratios. For the average gold investor, however, mutual funds and ETFs are now generally the easiest and safest way to invest in gold.
Broadly speaking, physical gold can be purchased in the following forms: gold bars, gold coins, and gold rounds. However, unlike silver, gold isn’t available in ‘junk’ form as the United States confiscated all gold currency in the 1930s. Hence, not only are older gold coins relatively rare, they also command higher premiums – making them a poor investment choice for those looking to build a precious metals portfolio.
While owning gold stocks is not the same as owning physical gold, the price of these stocks is influenced, at least in part, by the market price of gold. A portion of a gold mining company's assets is typically made up of refined or raw gold, so a change in the market value of the metal will affect the value of the gold the mining company owns. A change in the value of the company's assets can affect its stock price.
Good question. There are thousands of dealers in the country, but there is no federal regulation and little state regulation. The U.S. Mint has a list of national dealers and dealers by state that it checks but doesn’t vouch for. White says that the Mint checks those dealers against the Better Business Bureau list for complaints, as well as online to see whether there is “any negative information about the firm and to get a feel for how the company conducts and promotes itself.”
Despite headwinds related to the likelihood of additional interest rate hikes, gold may be poised to deliver solid returns again during the fourth quarter of 2018. The precious metal has traditionally been perceived as a safe haven investment in times of economic uncertainty and the recent concerns – along with the slide in stock prices – certainly fit the bill.
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