Morris & Watson aims to provide as much information as possible to investors in Gold & Silver. Many ask for tips to successful investing in Gold & Silver or how to invest in Gold & Silver, so here is some helpful tips supplied by Adam Van Sambeek, Treasury Manager at Morris & Watson, Auckland, with over 17 years experience in Financial Markets and Commodity trading.

Buy physical gold at various prices: coins, bars and jewelry. Some of the most popular gold coins are American Buffalo, American Eagle and St. Gauden's. You can store gold in bank safety deposit boxes or in your home. You can also buy and sell gold at your local jewelers. Other companies like Kitco.com allow you to store gold with them as well as trade the metal.
The price of gold bullion is volatile, but unhedged gold shares and funds are regarded as even higher risk and even more volatile. This additional volatility is due to the inherent leverage in the mining sector. For example, if one owns a share in a gold mine where the costs of production are $300 per ounce and the price of gold is $600, the mine's profit margin will be $300. A 10% increase in the gold price to $660 per ounce will push that margin up to $360, which represents a 20% increase in the mine's profitability, and possibly a 20% increase in the share price. Furthermore, at higher prices, more ounces of gold become economically viable to mine, enabling companies to add to their production. Conversely, share movements also amplify falls in the gold price. For example, a 10% fall in the gold price to $540 will decrease that margin to $240, which represents a 20% fall in the mine's profitability, and possibly a 20% decrease in the share price.
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Adding precious metals to your current individual retirement account is a simple process. When you open a Gold / Silver IRA, it is established as a Self-Directed individual retirement account. A Self-Directed IRA is a retirement account that allows account holders the freedom to invest in alternative assets such as precious metals like gold and silver.
A.  For the conservative, risk-averse investor who is concerned about economic uncertainties and instability in the financial system -- the answer is an unequivocal "yes." Former Fed chairman Alan Greenspan recently remarked that "Gold is a good place to put money these days given its value as a currency outside of the policies conducted by governments." The rationale for gold ownership within a retirement plan is the same as it is outside the plan. (Newcomers, please see Gold Chartography 101 - The case for gold ownership in ten charts you will never see on CNBC)
Many types of gold "accounts" are available. Different accounts impose varying types of intermediation between the client and their gold. One of the most important differences between accounts is whether the gold is held on an allocated (fully reserved) or unallocated (pooled) basis. Unallocated gold accounts are a form of fractional reserve banking and do not guarantee an equal exchange for metal in the event of a run on the issuer's gold on deposit. Another major difference is the strength of the account holder's claim on the gold, in the event that the account administrator faces gold-denominated liabilities (due to a short or naked short position in gold for example), asset forfeiture, or bankruptcy.
Then there's the question of how to own it, which is equally complicated, with coins and bullion, ETFs, mutual funds, miners, and streaming companies among the various investment options. However, if you take some time to get to know gold and the different ways in which you can get exposure to the metal, I think you'll find that it isn't as risky as some people think and deserves a small place in your otherwise diversified portfolio.
A Gold IRA Rollover provides the perfect opportunity to convert profits from the second-longest bull market on record, into protection for the same portfolio. And protection should be more than just a consideration in a global environment where the new U.S. administration is struggling with; dire global political threats, dire global economic threats, and a continually growing national debt that has the International Monetary Fund (IMF) seriously considering replacement of the dollar and other global reserve currencies, with a “One World” currency of their own.
A gold coin is made predominantly of gold. Bullion coins are used for investment purposes. Other gold coins for sale are meant to be sold to collectors. Bullion coins are valued based on the gold content while collectible coins may have numismatic value.  (However, be careful, as many items sold as rare or collectible are worth no more than their actual melt value.)
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But there are also some risks specific to investing in physical gold. Any physical commodity is subject to theft. Someone could break into the depository where your gold is being stored. However, to qualify for gold IRAs, depositories are required to be insured, which would protect your investment as long as your account doesn’t exceed the custodian’s stated value on accounts,
A gold coin is made predominantly of gold. Bullion coins are used for investment purposes. Other gold coins for sale are meant to be sold to collectors. Bullion coins are valued based on the gold content while collectible coins may have numismatic value.  (However, be careful, as many items sold as rare or collectible are worth no more than their actual melt value.)

Gold exchange-traded products (ETPs) represent an easy way to gain exposure to the gold price, without the inconvenience of storing physical bars. However exchange-traded gold instruments, even those that hold physical gold for the benefit of the investor, carry risks beyond those inherent in the precious metal itself. For example, the most popular gold ETP (GLD) has been widely criticized, and even compared with mortgage-backed securities, due to features of its complex structure.[46][47][48][49][50]
While some people tend to call any movement of funds from one retirement account to another a rollover, the IRS makes a clear distinction between a rollover and a transfer. In a rollover, the money being moved is paid to you and you then deposit the funds in the other account. In a funds transfer, the original custodian of the IRA transfers the funds directly to the new IRA custodian you designated to receive the funds. You basically never see the money.
To help customers avoid that threat, some IRA companies will buy back your gold at, say, the then-prevailing wholesale price. Even so, thanks to the initial spread our hypothetical investor paid to open her $50,000 IRA, she would need gold prices to rise by over 20% just to break even. Compare that to the cost of a conventional IRA, where opening and closing an account is often free and transactions may cost just $8 per trade.
Warren Buffett, the CEO of Berkshire Hathaway (tickere: BRK.A, BRK.B) and perhaps the greatest investor of all time, understands that fear. Gold investors, he says, are "right to be afraid of paper money. Their basic premise that paper money around the world is going to be worth less and less over time is absolutely correct. They have the correct basic premise. They should run from paper money."
Born and raised in the Deep South of Georgia, Jason now calls Southern California home. A Fool since 2006, he began contributing to Fool.com in 2012. Trying to invest better? Like learning about companies with great (or really bad) stories? Jason can usually be found there, cutting through the noise and trying to get to the heart of the story. Follow @TMFVelvetHammer
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