White says that American Eagle Bullion coins, one of the most popular coins for investing in gold, first make their way into the market when they are sold to the Mint’s “authorized purchasers.” (See the list below of the authorized purchasers and their prices, terms and conditions. If you’re new to buying gold, they are a great place to start.) Gold coins are also sold in commemorative editions directly to the public, but these are more expensive. The Mint marks up the price of the coins to cover the value of the gold and the actual minting, as well as shipping and other costs, White says. Dealers say that markup is about 3%. Then the authorized purchasers -- some of whom sell directly to the public and all of whom sell to other dealers -- add their own markup, as do the dealers who buy the coins.


I think that insider buying is generally a positive sign, because it means insiders are bullish on the company's stock, believe it is undervalued or mispriced, and believe it will rise. I pay attention to insider transactions carefully and I believe it can help investors outperform benchmark gold indexes, including the VanEck gold miners index (GDX), junior miners index (GDXJ) and the price of gold (GLD).
This is perhaps the best-known form of direct gold ownership. Many people think of gold bullion as the large gold bars held at Fort Knox. Actually, gold bullion is any form of pure, or nearly pure, gold that has been certified for its weight and purity. This includes coins, bars, etc., of any size. A serial number is commonly attached to gold bars as well, for security purposes.
This is why some investors like to buy gold in a more indirect fashion, via mining stocks. The prices of mining stocks tend to follow the prices of the commodities on which they focus, so there's a logic to this approach. However, because miners are running businesses that can expand over time, investors can benefit from increasing gold production. This can provide upside that owning gold coins never will.
This is an obvious simplification of a far more complex history. However, in some ways, it was only natural that early humans would begin using the precious metal as a way to facilitate trade and accumulate and store wealth.  In fact, early paper currencies were generally backed by gold, with every printed bill corresponding to an amount of gold held in a vault somewhere for which it could, technically, be exchanged (this rarely happened). This approach to paper money lasted well into the 20th century. That said, modern currencies are largely fiat currencies, so the link between gold and paper money has long been broken. 
Gold coins seem like they are everywhere. Popular products such as the American Gold Eagle coin and the South African Krugerrand have been traded for decades. Some investors think that they only way to buy silver is in coins with numismatic value, such as silver dollars. The truth is that you can buy one-ounce silver American Eagle coins — the silver version of the gold coins — for just a small premium over the current silver spot price.
Once you’ve opened your gold IRA, you can contact the company managing your 401(k) account to begin the rollover process. First you’ll have to choose between a direct and indirect rollover. In an indirect rollover, you withdraw the funds from one account and then deposit them in another. With a direct IRA rollover, the funds move directly from one account to another. The direct option is usually much simpler, and it comes with less risk of IRS penalties.
Now that you understand why buying Gold is a good use of your investment dollar, you may need guidance regarding how to buy physical Gold. Luckily, buying physical Gold is simple. If you choose an established, well-regarded Precious Metals company, you can buy with confidence. Buying physical Gold should be an enjoyable part of your investment journey. Consider working with APMEX to experience the thrill of buying physical Gold free from worry. A common first purchase is the Gold American Eagle, one of the most popular Gold bullion items with investors.
The first and perhaps most obvious way that you can add gold to your retirement portfolio is by buying physical gold. Generally investors will buy physical gold in the form of bullion coins or bars through a dealer. While that might sound simple, as with any investment, it’s important to do your research and make sure you’re using a reputable dealer.
14.10 One Year Limit to Bring Claims. CUSTOMER ACKNOWLEDGES AND AGREES THAT, REGARDLESS OF ANY STATUTE OR LAW TO THE CONTRARY, ANY CLAIM OR CAUSE OF ACTION CUSTOMER MAY HAVE ARISING OUT OF, RELATING TO, OR CONNECTED WITH THE PRODUCTS OR THIS AGREEMENT, MUST BE FILED WITHIN ONE CALENDAR YEAR AFTER SUCH CLAIM OR CAUSE OF ACTION ARISES, OR FOREVER BE BARRED. CUSTOMER FURTHER ACKNOWLEDGES THAT, BUT FOR THIS WAIVER, CUSTOMER MIGHT HAVE A LONGER TIME PERIOD TO INITIATE A CLAIM UNDER STATE OR FEDERAL LAW.
There are analysts and newsletter publishers covering the precious metals industry who get paid by some of the companies they write about. And despite a so-called "Chinese Wall", it's well known that broker-analysts often focus on stocks that are likely to do M&A deals and/or sell shares or debt, both generating their firms huge commissions of up to 7%, which adds up to millions of dollars. So, whose side are these analysts really on?
Gold is respected throughout the world for its value and rich history, which has been interwoven into cultures for thousands of years. Coins containing gold appeared around 800 B.C., and the first pure gold coins were struck during the rein of King Croesus of Lydia about 300 years later. Throughout the centuries, people have continued to hold gold for various reasons. Below are eight reasons to own gold today.
Unlike most paper assets, gold held in physical form – pure gold bullion, and gold bullion coins produced by government mints – carries no counter-party risk. As such, when you hold physical gold you are not dependent on anyone’s managerial performance such as in stocks, bonds and managed accounts. The value of your gold simply reflects world prices with you as the sole decision maker on if and when to buy and sell. Historically gold prices are less volatile than those of other precious metals and can serve as an excellent candidate for long-term investment.

Once you've built your gold position, you should strongly consider keeping it a core portion of your portfolio. That, of course, comes with a caveat: If you target a 10% allocation to gold, then once a year or so you'll want to revisit that allocation to make sure it's still roughly where you want it. If gold is having a good year and your position has increased to 12% or more of your portfolio, it's wise to sell some of the position to bring it back to 10%, and put the resulting cash into other investments. Conversely, if your gold position falls to 8% or so, then you may want to add to it to bring it back to your 10% target. This is really just simple portfolio rebalancing, but it's an important maintenance issue that you shouldn't forget about.   

That's not to say that there aren't any good gold-related investments to consider, and the precious metal, along with companies heavily tied to it, can offer exposure to a different asset class. So we reached out to three regular Motley Fool contributors for an alternative perspective on some gold stocks worth watching right now, and they came back with Barrick Gold Corp (USA) (NYSE:ABX), mining equipment giant Caterpillar Inc. (NYSE:CAT), and gold streamer Royal Gold, Inc. (USA) (NASDAQ:RGLD). 

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