The value of numismatic coins is determined by features such as condition, age, rarity and the number of coins originally minted. An example of a coveted collector's coin is the Spur Royal. The grade of the coin also matters, which is a numerical score assigned based on a visual evaluation of the amount of wear. Basic grades are good, fine, and un-circulated. The Universal rarity scale and the Sheldon rarity scale are the scales used to determine how rare a coin might be.

This is an extension of the ‘bad times’ reason for keeping gold. In the last 100 years, many parts of the world have undergone some kind of an upheaval that has led to a breakdown of society and institutions. In these circumstances, physical gold is a currency that can survive when paper currencies do not. It’s essentially a currency which is somewhat better, in some ways, than actual currencies. Of course, in India physical gold has served yet another purpose, that of keeping wealth away from taxation.
Do you remember all the hype around gold in the not-so-distant past? From 2007 to 2011, the value of an ounce of gold went from about $500 to $1,800! If you would have purchased gold in 2007, you would have nearly quadrupled your investment in just five years! Now that is one heck of an investment. Around this time, I also pronounced that you shouldn’t buy gold — and it received a lot of criticism.
Barrick is the gold mining leader, both in terms of size and low operating costs. Company guidance calls for all-in sustaining costs (AISC) of just $765 to $815 per ounce for 2018. The gold miner cranked out an impressive $1.5 billion in free cash flow (FCF) in 2016, which may have contributed to a 42% dividend hike to investors that year. FCF ticked downward in 2017, but Barrick is still generating enough to secure continued payouts, and the dividend yield is currently 1.05%.
×